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Congratulations to Dr Areej Abuhammad who has been awarded the 2017 L’Oreal prize for Women in Science, for her research on enzymes and their structure as related to pharmacology. Areej studied for a DPhil in the Department between 2008 and 2012, funded by the University of Jordan, investigating the structure of proteins identified as potential targets for novel TB therapies.  She was supervised by Professor Edith Sim, former Head of the Department, and Professor Elspeth Garman (Biochemistry). Areej is a crystallographer and has recently been appointed Head of the Department of Pharmacy in the University of Jordan where she has been a lecturer and has established a research group

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John Parrington launches ‘Mind Shift: How culture transformed the human brain’

Department

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Vasudevan lab identifies novel means of improving sensitivity and efficiency for PCR COVID testing

Department Vasudevan Group

In collaboration with the infectious disease units at the John Radcliffe and Churchill Hospitals, the Vasudevan lab has identified a novel means of improving RT-qPCR sensitivity and efficiency for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 through the concentration of pooled patient lysates.