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This year's Paton Prize in the Department of Pharmacology was won jointly by Alexander Von Klemperer, from the Akerman group, and Chris Lindsay, in the Sitsapesan and Russell groups.

The Paton Prize features second year DPhil students who are asked to present their research to members of the Department. This year's prize was judged by Professor Helen Christian (DPAG), Associate Professor Catherine Pears (Department of Biochemistry), and Dr Tommas Ellender.

Chris's presentation was titled: 'Statins activate skeletal RyR1 channels: Design of the next-generation statin drug' while Alex talked about 'Investigating the role of neuronal progenitors on the diversity of layer 2/3 pyramidal cells'.

The following students were also highly commended for their presentations:

  • Carla Da Silva Santos, Platt Group:  Glycosphingolipid dysregulation and lysosomal dysfunction in motor neurone disease
  • Purnima Kumar, Russell Group: Treating acute myeloid leukaemia: overcoming the differentiation block
  • Gokhan Yilmaz, Platt Group: Unexpected link between lysosomes and regulation of cytoskeleton: lessons from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C

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